Archive for July, 2007

Stories and comments from the gallery.

Below are a couple of stories added to our comments book in the gallery at FACT.

I have been a pedestrian and car parker of Bold Street since the 70’s (before you had to pay to park your car there) when the vinyl records were playing from Jayne Caseys flat in 61a, the very vinyl records that ‘hairy records’ are selling, when culture came from ordinary people and their flats - that was their exhibition space.

I used to meet lots of mates on Boldie in the 80’s, I would hang out in cafe Berlin which was more like a social club. Wouldn’t it be gorgeous to have more things happening with outside entertainment in the street, it would be fab to see it decorated with festival stuff going on rather than just a doorway from the South end of town into the city centre.

I’d go to Bold Street every week, to get ‘an phoblacht’ republican news from ‘News from Nowhere’ top paper top shop! I was there one day when some Nazi’s put the windows in. Great exhibition, cheers beans.

I think Bold Street is as good for shopping now as what it was 50 years ago and I don’t think it will change, in addition it is better than Oxford Street in London.

What happened to to the El Kabala Coffee bar? Situated where News from Nowhere is now.

Thoroughly enjoyed ‘The Bolder they Walk’, great job Kim, Chris & Alex. What can I say - keep the gowns etc they suit you. Who is the stalker in the straw hat/pink bag? Started to do my head in a bit - nearly every shot!!! Stories of Bolds Street:- I can just about remember going to a record shop in the late 60’s with my elder, hippy/trendy brother (now mid 50’s), all bean bags, smelly stuff!!!!! Headphones/booths to listen to the latests sounds. Bold Street is a beautiful street to promenade along St. Lukes at the top, what a sight, love it.

My memories of lovely Bold Street: My mum took me when I was 41/2 to the Lyceum Cafe at the bottom of the street. I was so excited, I remember the high-backed chairs, the polite waitresses in black dresses with white aprons. We had toasted teacakes and I had ‘white lemonade’ for the first time. Later on, aged 9, I went on Saturdays to ballets classes of Sheila Elliott Clarke School & would buy myself a bar of chocolate from Thortons, when it was halfway up the street. Later on again, I worked for 3 years as a secretary at 66 Bold Street, where I met my future husband in a quality surveyors office. Also, I bought my wedding dress for £16 in the sale at the shop called ‘M.Rose’ halfway up the right hand side.

Thank you to everyone for sharing these stories with us

Leon & visitors in Media Lounge

Bold Street in the 40’s

Continuing with the theme of Bold Street stories below is the story of Agnes Curnow (nee Smith) who remembers the Bold Street of Cripps, T.S Bacon and her own shop Drinkwaters.

Bold Street

In 1943 I started work at a high-class dressmakers in Bold Street. I was 14 years old and it was my second job. My first one had been for about eight months, in a printers in Wrexham, having been evacuated there on the 3rd September 1939 - the day that the war started.

When most of the bombing had stopped we return to Liverpool in 1943 and thats how I arrived at my second job of apprentice dressmaker, at the tender age of 14.

The dressmakers was very exclusive and called ‘Drinkwaters’ making top quality ladies’ wear and outfits for ladies who were going to be ‘Present at Court’ known in those days as ‘coming out.’

The name of G W Drinkwater was spread across the front window for all to see. The shop and workroom was on the first floor and was reached by a set of wide stone steps leading from the pavement.

Looking up Bold Street from the Hanover Street end it was not very far up on the left hand side. Next door to Waring and Gillow who sold quality furniture and almost opposite the Kardomah Cafe which specialised in coffee - the fragrance was very nice and seemed to travel the full length of the street.

Also on the first floor was a milliners, with the Elliott Clarke School of Dance and Drama on the floor above. It was all very posh to me in those days.

I was the youngest of the workers as most of the other were a lot older than I was except for a girl of about 19 who started about three years later. The others were what I thought of at the time as middle aged women.

The were probably the good-old-days of Bold Street and the high class feel of the area may well be gone now. I worked there until 1947 and when I left I joined the land army and was posted to Cornwall, where I have lived ever since.

Thank you so much to Agnes for sharing her memories with us.

Bearly there……

Troxler’s Swiss Cafe, home to beautiful cakes, harassed staff and the only stuffed bear on Bold Street.

In 1945/46 I was a young shorthand typist in Liverpool,
and every Friday, pay-day (27s.6d or £1.37p a week)an office colleague and
I would treat ourselves to a 3-course lunch at Troxler’s Swiss Cafe in Bold
Street. It cost us 2s.3d (11p!) which was the maximum the Government
allowed us to pay for a meal in those rationed days. Inside the entrance
stood a huge stuffed brown bear on its hind legs,looking a bit motheaten.
The meal was always very tasty, served up by a harassed waitress called
Bessie, who’d be about 40 then. We thought her rather elderly. The
clientele were quite fashionable - we all wore hats and gloves in those
days, especially when entering Bold St. As far as I can remember, I only
once ventured into one of those elegant shops, and that was to purchase a
silk Jaqumar headscarf - every girl’s status symbol then! Now at the age of
80, I often walk up Bold St. and find the mix of shops and people very
interesting. But what a difference from our young days! I hope my little
memoir will interest you, and that other people will remember Troxlers.
Good luck in your project.

Thank you so much to Audrey Thomas for this story.

Thank You Bold Street (by Stuart Ian Burns)

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As per Laura’s recent post about Bold Street tales, it seems so many people have stories to tell about this famous Liverpool thoroughfare.  However, we now have a growing community of Liverpool writers (and story tellers) online and you can find local blogger Stuart Ian Burns either at Liverpool Blogs or at his personal blog Feeling Listless. We wanted to get a blogger’s opinion of Bold Street so we asked Stuart to tell us what he thought…

“It’s only recently I’ve considered how indispensable the Bold Street area has become, at least to me. At present, each Thursday, I have a routine. Before the weekly shop at the Tesco Metro, I get off the bus outside of St. Luke’s Church then stroll or rush down Bold Street depending upon how late I am. I’ll pass through Forbidden Planet looking for Joss Whedon written comic books and magazines about a certain timelord who travels in a police box; to Oxfam next in case they’ve something new about Shakespeare; on then to The Works to see if there’s a sale and to the shop formerly known as Home & Bargain to check if they have anything worth buying too; new arrival HMV perhaps on the rare occasion that a decent record that been released and possibly Waterstones if I’m looking for something to read and through to Church Street for WH Smiths and …

I also usually end up passing through too if there’s a special day to prepare for, a birthday, Mother’s Day, Father’s Day, Christmas, Easter. It could be to find a card a Rennies or a bottle of red at Oddbins but sometimes I’ll be looking for something unusual which you simply can’t find anywhere else, in which case Utility is the place to go and when the recipient has told me what they want, there is Argos and the wait within for the opening of the hatch. But incredibly Bold Street also serves my entertainment and caffeine needs with the FACT Centre and its cinema and exhibition spaces and café and restaurant and further down the road Starbucks if I’m in a corporate coffee mood (with Costa Coffee opposite on the rare occasion when I want a change of place). I even booked my last holiday there, three days in Paris, at STA Travel.

I can’t remember when I first visited Bold Street, but I know I must have been young. I was brought up in Speke through the seventies and eighties and in those days a trip to the city centre was a special treat, let alone Bold Street. When you’re very young geography doesn’t mean much to you — there’s just shapes and colour and then toys and games. So whilst I remember visiting the Medici Gallery to buy a birthday card and the 50p shop for a colouring book or Star Wars toys it’s only now that I realise they were on Bold Street (especially since they’re both gone now). Something I definitely have memories of is Penny Lane Records, an outpost of a shop actually on the street from which is took its name; that was were I fanned the flames of many a teenage pop star crush but also discovered that Louis Armstrong recorded more than just ‘Wonderful World’.

But the time when I was most grateful for Bold Street just being there, was when I was working in the city centre and wanted somewhere to disappear to at lunch time. Even after all these years, the place has a strange mystique particularly at the ’top end’ — it’s really not like anywhere else in Liverpool which means that after you’ve passed the Rapid Hardware Furniture shop you could be anywhere, which in that empty daily hour helped to drag me out of the mess I was in even if it was for a few brief minutes and could pretend I was somewhere else, which was good therapy in the job I was doing in which I had to greet the people of my own city hard-on. Popping into Café Tabac for some soup, buying a sandwich in the Soul Café, a drink in that newsagents just down the way from Mattas or …

Thank you Bold Street. For everything, it turns out.”

Thank you indeed Bold Street, and thank you Stuart!

- Oh, and thanks also to Pete Carr for this amazing Bold Street image recently uploaded to the Bold Street Flickr Group!

Flickr on Friday

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Last Friday was the Flickr Friday meetup - a meetup for Liverpool photographers in conjunction with the Bold Street Project. A quick look at the lively Bold Street Exhibition was followed by a talk by Patrick Henry, the Open Eye Gallery’s director about the gallery, and its history on Bold Street. More history followed with guided tours of the E. Chambre Hardman house and photographic studio on Rodney Street. On a very rainy day we were pleased with the turnout - I think around 15 of us did the tour! A good time was had by all - but where are all your photos everyone?

Bold Street uncovered

I have had so many stories since I began this project, some are interwoven into the Bold Street exhibition itself (on in the Media Lounge in FACT until the 19th August) some are orally told via interviews, stories, songs and poems and some are still waiting to be told.

I thought I would post a series of blogs with stories I have been sent and told which have given me an amazing insight into the streets effect on the people who have visited it over its 227 year history.

The first ‘famous’ person I saw in Liverpool (I’ve only seen two and the other was an _enormous_ footballer) was on Bold Street - it was 1993 (or early 94?) and I had just started as a student at the University of Liverpool. Before I came to uni I used to hang around with this group of lads from Lancaster Boys Grammar School who were all a bit weird and their favourite viewing was Red Dwarf…

Hmm, Liverpool, Red Dwarf, ‘famous’ who could it be…?

…yes, you’ve guessed it, it was the world-renowned - ho ho - Craig Charles…

falling down the stairs and back up again (several hours later) at 2 of the best former clubs in Liverpool.

MacMillans- now a bookshop (and they call that progress!). The launchpad for many a Liverpool legend. Used to DJ in there and was once mistaken for superstar (at the time) DJ Terry Farley. I was over the moon until some weeks later when I saw a picture of him. Not the average male pin up it needs to be said.

And of course the legendary Mardi Gras (even more stairs). Two floors of pure joy. The most eclectic venue in the city for many a year. Home of the now legendary G-love events in 1989. Sadly closed due to probably failing every health and safety test possible. I can even remember carrying wheelchair bound friends up and down the many flights of stairs.

Tabac Cafe- Sadly I preferred it when it was not quite so upmarket and you felt ‘out there’ ordering a bowl of chilli con carne with garlic bread.

Walking down Bold street with my Dad and taking the mickey of out the “largest hearing aid in the world” chair and secretly never being sure if they were serious or not!! This would be late ’70’s/early ’80’s.

The Mardi Gras and dancing the night away with all the crowd from the Everyman back in 1988/89/90/91 - meeting some of the people who are still some of my closest friends now and meeting the first happy out gay people that I knew -

Going into News From Nowhere and hanging around the gay/lesbian section in the hope of being swept off my feet by a mad literary lesbian or two…I still see people doing that now! You can always tell they have only just realised they’re gay or have just come out by the books they are buying.

And of course, Maggie May’s as the FACT staff canteen - all the gossip going down over a plate of egg and chips surrounded by a mix of elderly ladies, workies and drag queens in their day clothes!


I remember when it was a proper street; then it was ‘pedestrianised’ with ugly oval plant holders and benches nobody ever sat on in the late 1970s or early 1980s, and now it looks like a proper street again.

I also remember a club called the Four Seasons by what is now Starbucks during the 1980s. it was dreadful cheesy place with lots of pale green walls and mirrors. I once went there when I was at college to hear a student friend called Debi Jones sing to some gangsters (friends of her husband) who might get her work singing in their clubs. She sang some standards and a song called Pete the Piddling Pup about an incontinent dog, which went down really well! Whether she got any work I do not know.

The Warehouse shop near the bottom used to have a café on the first floor which was one of the coolest places in Liverpool to have a coffee. The walls were plastered and painted to look like concrete. Café Berlin near the top was definitely one of the coolest cafés in town and popular with musicians and artists. It featured on the front of an Icicle Works album whose name I can’t remember. Café Society nearby was a clothes shop selling 1950s overcoats and Dr Martins boots, very popular with trendies in the mid 1980s. The top end was a little trendy enclave with the record shop (still there I think) and Café Tabac (coffee like dragon’s blood) as well as Café Society and Café Berlin further down. The shop at the very top used to have a boat made of shells in the window which has/had been there for decades; the shop itself is maybe a part of the old RAF club upstairs.

Mattas International Food Stores is a Liverpool institution selling Indian food and odd pastas and Greek bread and frozen fish and Chinese pancakes. It used to be renowned for its raisins in yoghurt and incense and its bags were once THE carrier bag to be seen with. Ian Perry might not have such fond memories of Mattas!

My partner then was a music journalist. I used to get so vexed because every single time we walked down Bold Street, someone from a band would rush at him with a demo tape.It took so long to get from one end to the other, we used to do “Musician Alert”, and hide in doorways.

I remember coming over from the Wirral to Bold street for my first ballet exam aged about eight. The dance studio was above one of the shops near the top and I was really nervous as I crossed the busy street filled with shoppers.

Mardi Gras

Flickr Friday: A Liverpool Photography Tour

Katie Lips and the Bold Street Project presents Flickr Friday: a Flickr meetup with a difference; next Friday 20th July.

Join us for a Liverpool Photography tour taking in the Open Eye Gallery and the fabulous E. Chambre Hardman Photographic Studio on Rodney Street. We’re pleased to announce we’ll get a unique special tour of both the Open Eye and the Hardman Photographic Studio. It’s for anyone in Liverpool interested in Photography, Liverpool Photography, and Flickr!

The Schedule (20th July)

4.30 Bold Street Project Tour (Media Lounge, FACT, 88 Wood Street)

Katie Lips, Laura Yates and Patrick Fox will offer a guided tour of the Bold Street Project.

Then we’ll take a short walk to the Open Eye Gallery.

5.00 Open Eye Gallery Tour (28-32 Wood Street)
Take a look at the Open Eye’s ‘Clinic’ an exhibition that explores the aesthetics of the medical universe through contemporary photography.
http://www.openeye.org.uk/

Then we’ll take another quick walk to Hardman Street.

5.45 A guided tour of Mr Chambré Hardman’s Home and Photographic Studio (59 Rodney Street)
Sarah-Jane Langley, the Custodian of the house will give us a special tour of the house and its history.
http://www.nationaltrust.org.uk/main/w-vh/w-visits/w-findaplace/w-59rodneystreet/

Following that inspiring 2 hours we’ll finish up with a drink or two at Parr Street’s most creative venue: Parr Street 3345 from around 6.30.

The Bold Street Project and The Flickr Group: Background

The Bold Street project has been uncovering, filming and photographing Bold Street Liverpool, its social, cultural and economic history, from the perspective of its traders, residents and community; and from the perspective of many Liverpool based Flickr members and photographers.

http://www.flickr.com/groups/boldstreet/

Flickr.com has played an enormous part in the project; enabling us to show the Bold Street images online as well as in the Media Lounge Exhibit. The Liverpool photographer community has been instrumental in helping us create a unique, diverse and significant collaborative work. New photographs of Bold Street and its people, contributed by Flickr members is now displayed in the Bold Street project exhibition at FACT, Liverpool.

As a thank you to the Flickr community, and so that we can meet even more of you, we have arranged this unique photography tour event as a Flickr Meetup,

We hope to see you there! Please sign up on Upcoming: http://upcoming.yahoo.com/event/219033

We Love Technology….

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… so much that the Bold Street Project will be ‘appearing’ at the We Love Technology conference in Huddersfield tomorrow. I will be talking about the Bold Street Project, and this blog as the catalyst of all the online work we’ve been doing to put Bold Street in the online limelight.

We Love Technology is organised by the fabulous Lisa Roberts from Blink Media and compered by Matt Locke; Commissioning Editor, New Media and Education at Channel 4.

“Led by pioneering technologists and artists working in areas such as interactive architecture, sound and games, WLT07 presents the latest adventures in the creative use and misuse of technology.”

The line up looks wonderful and I can’t wait to share all the Bold Street stories!

Cripps, Sons & Co

Cripps

Cripps, the name has been with me since my very first day on The Bold Street Project back in January. Cripps was an upmarket ladies’ outfitters based at the bottom of Bold Street (in what is now Waterstones) catering for the well-to-do of Merseyside and Cheshire society. I have records mentioning Cripps in its location 12, 14 & 16 Bold Street from the mid 1800’s - late 1900’s.

I was contacted by a lady who worked at Cripps, Maureen, who was a dressmaker in the store from 1962 - 66. For a dressmaker a job at Cripps meant you were set up such was the prestigious reputation of the shop.

Workers would arrive and leave through the entrance at the back of the buidling, onto Wood Street. Here a man would be waiting to sign you into work, Maureen generally remembers it being a very strict environment to work in with no talking amongst the staff and no music playing in the shop.

Cripps was known for making and altering clothing on site which stretched from hats and furs to specially made dresses for ladies who had specific physical requirements from their clothes.

Often ladies would have a new musquash, mink, rabbit or fox fur coat instead of an engagement ring from prospective husbands, although the irony was that most of the women working in Cripps were not married - expected instead to be married to their job.

Maureen particularly remembers a lady named Miss Delaney, her supervisor during her years at Cripps.

Cripps

Image Courtesy of Liverpool Record Office.

Story of a gas life.

Radiant House, former headquaters of the Liverpool Gas Co for me is one of the most interesting buildings on the street. So you can imagine my excitement when I was contacted by a lady who worked in the building from 1951 - 1983. She described to me a workplace furnished to the highest possible standards with a commissionaire called Fred guarding the front entrance.

Radiant House

Gladys started work straight from school and remembers it being very strict. She was based in the wages department on the 4th floor of Radiant House and recalls the boss coming round regularly to inspect handwriting and figure work.

The building had many different area’s apart from the main shop floor there was also a theatre/demonstration room where young women, known as service advisors, advised people on how to use the cookers (see Vegetable Pie, a film made in Radiant House by Service Advisors on www.youtube.com.) Areas for the overall administration of Gas, a staff canteen and boardrooms and offices for the Directors of the Gas Company.

The boardrooms in particular stuck in the mind of Gladys who remembers them as plush, luxurious spaces totally out of bounds to staff and served by their own chef who cooked lunch and dinner for the directors.

Boardrooms

The Golden Eagle, currently on display in the Media Lounge in FACT as part of The Bold Street project was actually once located in Radiant House - a veritable Bold Street celebrity!

Radiant Bird

Thank you to Gladys for sharing her story with us.

Roland and the Cornet

Bold Street has some great buskers, at any given time on any given day the melodic hum of accordions, guitars, drums and trumpets can be heard wafting around the street. I received the following story from Bold Street’s infamous trumpet player, Barry.

Barry

Bold Street. A chilly day in April, felt like going back to bed after having a massive party in the brewery tap for my 50th. Need a cup of tea and cheering up……An elderly gentleman approached carrying a square case with a serious look about him. He stood next to me and waited until I had completed my melody. He turned to me an said: “here you are son (sic.) its yours now…I’ve had a heart attack and I don’t think I’ll be playing her again. I want it to go to a good home, providing you won’t sell it.”

Arms outstretched I took hold of the box, agape, as I had already seen Selmer logo on the case. Breathless in anticipation I placed the instrument carefully down flicked the catches on the lid and slowly opened it up. “Oh, is this really for me?” as I looked into his smiling face.” “What do you think of that son?” Speechless I gently lifted ‘her’ from her velvet bed. A Selmer cornet in shining brass with a silver bell. I held it firmly now realising just what a most incredible gift I had been given, I pressed the mother of pearl buttons down.

Adoration of the instrument quickly turned to this tall slim man, clearly in his 80’s. ‘It’s beautiful” I replied staring at in disbelief. A 1963 Selmer ‘Invicta’ in mint condition. It used to belong to a Mr. Parrot, John Parrot’s father (the ace snooker world champion) “there is obviously no chance I would sell this.” He simply left me with it still spellbound….a hand-made instrument of the highest quality.

Roland was an R.A.F technician and played on military bands on horn and guitar and managed the Rialto (Toxteth) until the 1950’s/60’s and played with their big band. I am now in touch with him regularly. He calls me ’son.’

Our thanks to Barry for this great story and to Roland for his great act of generosity.

Bold Street webcast 1

Last Wednesday at FACT tenantspin staged the first of the Bold Street live webcasts, chaired by Jayne Casey with guests John McGuirk, Matthew from Liverpool Vision, Kate from Utility and Mandy from News From Nowhere. The show will be archived on tenantspin soon and the discussion covered the reality of running a business on a changing Bold Street and its relation to other retail and cultural parts of Liverpool city centre.

Bold Street webcast 1

Down the Banks

Liverpool Union Bank

I received a lovely set of images from a lady at the Lloyds TSB group archives of the Lloyds branch at 66 - 68 (now Meet Brazilian bar & restaurant) and the Liverpool Union bank at 45 - 47 (now Quynny’s, Alharf Newsagent, Pizza Pronto and Mr Chip’s) which really show the flavour of Bold Street in the 1920’s.

The images are available to view on Flickr from today.

Private View evening

A total of 419 people passed through the Bold Street Project exhibition on Friday evening alone with another 500 over the weekend, breaking all recent attendance records. Laura and Ciara took these shots of Dolly, Vera, Steve, John, Emily, Paul and company.

Bold Street Project PV

Independence Day (Tomorrow!)

Tomorrow is Independence Day at FACT! Join the lovely Jayne Casey (loveliverpool) who’s chairing a keynote webcast discussion on the past, present and future of Bold Street. Join in in The Box, FACT, Wood Street, Liverpool 2.00-3.00pm

As one of the most important and historical streets in the city – once known as The Bond Street of The North - Bold Street has a rich story to tell. With its future uncertain as Liverpool City Centre changes beyond recognition, we examine its lifeblood, sounds, economy, policing, flavours and sense of community. Guests include Matthew Biagetti, Development Manager at Liverpool Vision, and representatives from News From Nowhere and Utility.

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The event is also listed on Upcoming, if you’re an Upcoming Fan!

Bold Street iMix

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Over the course of this project, Laura, Alan, Patrick and I have all come across a lot of music related facts relating to Bold Street. We began compiling a ‘playlist’ some time back to keep a record of Bold Street songs. Some are about Bold Street (such as 3am on Bold Street), some were performed on Bold Street (I am the Sun), some have historical links to Bold Street (anything on the His Master’s Voice label) and some just remind us of Bold Street (Celebrity Skin). The playlist is below, but you can also view this as an iMix in iTunes (which gives you links to hear and download all the songs if you like).

“Now that’s what I call Bold Street” Volume 1
His Master’s Voice - The National Jazz Ensemble
Black Lights - Jonas Thomassen & Jt Scam
The Harder They Come - Jimmy Cliff
Perambulator - The Icicle Works
C’mon Everybody - Eddie Cochran
I Am the Sun - Swans
Seven Minutes to Midnite (Live) - The Mighty Wah!
3 AM In Bold Street - Jegsy Dodd & The Original Sinners
Two Tribes - Frankie Goes to Hollywood
Hey Mersh! - Moe Tucker
Celebrity Skin - Hole

And if we get enough new suggestions, we’ll compile a Volume 2!

Bold Street Events: KIN

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It seems Bold Street is buzzing at the moment with creative and arts initiatives. On Wednesday Bold Street fashion favorite Microzine played host to a KIN networking evening. KIN is the network that connects creative people on Merseyside; and there are a lot of them it seems. The networking event attracted around 100 businesses in PR, media, film, fashion and design and other creative industries all gathering in the store enjoying drinks and bites before hearing Radio City’s Simon Ross interview James Barton, the founder of Cream. The event was hosted by Merseyside ACME who have funded and developed Kin.

Now at this point I have to reveal that while I fully intended attending, my hectic schedule last Wednesday in the middle of the install prevented me from doing so. (I also missed geekup and the Peter Blake opening at the Tate). However, I do know that several of my creative colleagues who did go had a great time and tell me it was well worth the visit. Looks like a great event, and hopefully we’ll see more of this in Bold Street.

Photo courtesy of Atmosferik Photography.

Finished! (And this is just the beginning)

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We uploaded a new set of images to Flickr. Not the best photography but hopefully some sneak preview/ behind the scenes / work in progress shots of pulling together an exhibtion in install week. The install week shots and a few of the best from the Private View (which we all thoroughly enjoyed) are on Flickr. We’d love to see your shots there too!

So after months of preparation The Bold Street Project is live and ready for visitors. Initial feedback was great - and I think Laura will be writing more about that soon. If you’ve seen it, please share you thoughts here on the blog and your photos online and help us make it even better.

Help create 800 poems for Liverpool

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Liverpool Poem800 is a new creative space for anyone to enjoy and create poems inspired by Liverpool. Created by Roger Cliffe-Thompson www.poem800.com will collect 800 poems for Liverpool’s birthday.  I particularly like “Liverpool… in the sixties” by Ian Hunter.  Of course if you feel inspired to write a Bold Street poem, we’d love to see it here too!




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