Archive for September, 2007

Even more comments from the gallery

“I think the future of Bold St. looks good.”

“Bold Street belongs to all people, past, present and future”.

”Bold street is great there’s always something happening, it’s tradition for me and my girlfriend to come to town every Saturday and go to as many shops on Bold St as we can. Forbidden planet, Home Bargains, Waterstones, HMV, Soul Cafe, etc. We wouldn’t know what we’d do with ourselves without it. The busking is great too.”

“After moving to Liverpool from the Wirral soon discovered Bold street as the place to meet people. It is much more bohemian than any other part of the city centre and as you walk down the street your would feel cultured by all the unique shops surrounding you.
I always seem to bump into somebody I know as I walk down the street and yet that doesn’t happen to me anywhere else like it does on BOLD STREET.”

More comments from the gallery

“When I was a teenager, I would hang round on a Saturday around Pryre records and the Palace and look at all the cool records and clothes we could’nt afford. When I was older I used to take Mondays off work and while everyone else was working I would buy books from ‘News from Nowhere’ and read them on St.Lukes steps with a rostie and a cake from Sayers. Now it’s been my high street for two years and I walk down it nearly everyday.”

“Bold street has never been far away from my life
-Dragged around the shops by my mum when i was a kid.
-In and out of the clubs in my teens and twenties.
-Now working in the new offices behind FACT.”

“My most abiding memory was when my girlfriend had a flat on Berry St 2003/4. A band were performng in ‘TABAC’ window facing cut onto the street. It looked excellent and like I’ve never seen since.
Has anyone else? (Think it was on August Bank Holiday weekend)”

“We love Bold St keep it going!”

“Michelle - You have masterstroked Bold St. Joseph Cornell had Utopia Parkway-this is yours Thanks for the beauty.”

“Very interesting - great visuals and display… where’s Matta’s? Otherwise brilliant.”

comments from the gallery

“Throughly enjoyed ‘The Bolder They Walk’, great job Kim, Chris and Alex. What can I say? Keep the gowns etc they suit you who is the stalker in the straw hat/pink bag? Started to do my head in a bit-nearly every shot!!!!
Stories of Bold street :-I can just about remember going to a record shop in the late 60s with my elder, hippy/friendly brother (now mid 50s), all beanbags, smelly stuff!!!! And headphone booths to listen to the latest sounds.
Bold street is a beautiful to promenade along to St.Lukes at the top, What a sight. Love it!”

“My memories of lovely Bold street: My mum took me whan I was 9 and a half to the Lyceum Cafe at the bottom of Bold Street. I was so excited. I remember the high backed chairs, the polite waitresses in black dresses with white gowns. We had toasted tea cakes and I had ‘white lemonade’ for the first time.
Later on still age 9 I went on saturdays to ballet classes Sheila Sillist Clark school and would buy myself a bar of chocolate from Thorntons which was halfway up the street.
Later on again i worked for 3 years as a secretary at 66 Bold street where i met my future husband in a quantity surveyors office. Also I bought my wedding dress for £16 in the sale at the shop called ‘M.Rose Laffway’ up on the right hand side”.

“I remember The swans at the mardi- it was so loud I had a nosebleed!
Also I saw Peter Kay at the Life cycle before he became famous.
And the Bhunda Boys at Cafe Berlin.
Wilson’s Healthfood shop -where ‘News from nowhere’ now live.
Characters wandering around Bold street- Pete Burns, Will Sergeant, Holly Johnson,Ian McCulloch, JayneCasey, all the cool Liverpool musicians - Julian Cope etc…
I also remember the 50p shop, the fur coat shop (which we used to campaign against), Cafe society - a really cool clothes shop, and 69A used to live in Bold St as well.
And Nick Cave did a book reading from ‘And the ass saw the Angel’ at Waterstones- it was then situated in Reflex Bar where McMillan’s used to be.
Planet x was once home in MacMillan’s.”

“I have fond memories of the Mardi and MacMillans, where they played great music and I met some great Like minded people. They were places I found I fitted in, where I met the friends I still have and we remember our experiences there and long for them again, these places united us then and unite us still. Meeting anyone who used to go to the Mardi and Macs . Is like meeting an old friend, even if I’ve never met them before.”

“I always thought of Bold St as the bridge between people who came into the city to shop (in Church St) and people who live on the outskirts (such as Toxteth). Once it was the shopping area for the rich and then like the houses on Princes road fell into ruin. Bold St made a comeback and became a fashionable area for the young with 69A, Flip ,Mardi and Liverpool Palace. I didn’t wait to see designer shops + Coffee shops, I’d like to see an investment to bring the shops back to their former glory but a place of Art, Culture, Literature, Retro clothes and music from the people of Liverpool we have a lot to give.”

Liverpool Savings Bank…a living memory.

Liverpool Savings Bank, at one time a prominent and familiar banking corporation in Liverpool once had branches spread all over the city. Bold Street was no exception, many of the Bold Street memories collected over the period of the project mention the bank once at 93, 95 & 97 (now Rapid Hardware Furniture Shop, coming down from the top on the right hand side) which was once the main bank for the depositing of wages by Bold Street workers. It was taken over in the 70’s by Lloyds TSB.

Lesley, a lady I met at The League of Welldoers (Lee Jones Centre) on Limekiln Lane mentioned to me that she had once worked at the Bank and kindly agreed to write a story about the experience.

“I went for my interview at Liverpool Savings Bank Head Office in January 1973 – the letter said to report to the side door – no front entrance for me!!

I was shown into a small office right at the back of the banking hall – the space was vast – high ceiling and so many staff, mostly men and all in suits. Voices echoed from the counter although from where I stood you couldn’t see it – there were so many screens and people.

It’s hard to explain the smell – but all traditional banking halls had the same smell – of marble, polish and money!!

After the interview I was taken through the busy banking hall, managing a quick look at the high wooden counters, and then through a door which opened into a large stairwell. A grand staircase swept up to a first floor boardroom and offices, the impact of such a grand sight immediately made you want to whisper if it hadn’t already struck you dumb!!

I passed my interview and was sent to work at Waterloo Branch but as ‘junior’ I would go to Bold Street one a week to pick up the branch ‘bag’ that would contain internal mail - a great way to meet all the other branch juniors! One day Bold Street’s manager called me to one side and asked where my suit jacket was – I explained I didn’t have one – he was appalled, his opinion was that a female in trousers should wear them as a part of a suit (similar to the male staff) – I made sure I was wearing a skirt on all my other visits!

Many years later I actually got the chance to work at the branch although by then it was called TSB plc with the head office in another part of the country. The impressive boardroom had become a staff lunch room but the high wooden counter was still there as were the wonderful staircase and that unforgettable smell!!

I’ve got really happy memories of Bold Street branch even the cellars, which were a bit dank and spooky but held so many secrets. The floor was always a bit damp being below the water basin and much of the paper had water stains and smelt a bit funny but it was an amazing place to ferret around oops I mean tidy up!!”

Thank you to Lesley for this wonderful story.

Quentin Tarantino, FACT, Bold Street and Peter K’s…..

Quentin

Tuesday 11th September saw Quentin Tarantino come to Liverpool to promote his new film Deathproof. Joan Burnett, the visitor services manager @ FACT was lucky enough to spend an evening in his charismatic company.

“What a guy! First, he wants to re-arrange his promotional trip to the UK to branch out from the usual round of London interviews to include Liverpool and Glasgow, as he said “to go somewhere working class”. Then when he gets here, he wants to sit in the audience to watch the film with them. He then announces he’s really fond of Cains 2008 ale and proceeds to drink a couple of bottles as the evening wears on. Quentin Tarantino, you’ve gone up in my estimation!

Death Proof is a pretty accurate rendering of seventies slasher movies, complete with in-yer-face girls and their not-so-happy endings. It falls into two distinct halves; in the first Stuntman Mike, played with impeccable cheesiness by Kurt Russell, gets his wicked way, while in the second half, it can only be said that girl-power wins out. If for nothing else, you should see this for the best car chase I have gasped at for a while - and as Mr T himself avowed, no CGI or special effects were used - Zoe Bell did all the work herself. Here we have a star turn. Ms Bell is a stuntwoman by trade and in Death Proof she certainly raises this speciality to an art-form. I was practically jumping out of my seat to cheer her on. No one has put a bit of scaff bar to such good use for a while even if I did have to look away…

Mr Tarantino took questions from the audience for over an hour, including some about his politics and his reaction to local protesters who had called him a mysogynist who glorifies violence against women for profit. He’s a great raconteur and obviously understands what makes an audience sit up and listen. It was a rare chance to see someone so lionised by the whole entertainment business talk openly and without pretension about their passion for creativity. he had some good pointers for up and coming creative people and a couple of good stories about his inspiration for the film.

A day later, the man was still in Liverpool and was seen whiling a mellow evening away with a few pints in Peter Kavanagh’s….he obviously meant what he said about wanting to see another side of the UK, away from the bright lights and corporate shindigs of the media world.”

While he was here Quentin was also seen wandering up and down Bold Street much to the shock and amusement of people on the street that day - it seems he was advised to do this by Samuel L Jackson who had the opportunity to explore the city during the filming of the 2001 film 51st State.

eighthundred. One day/eightphotographers/eighthundred Liverpool people.

As part of the celebrations for Liverpool’s 800th birthday a group of photographers got together to capture 800 portraits of Liverpool people. All the images were gathered over one day and features images by Bold Street contributor and well-known photographer Mark McNulty as well as images of Bold Street and her people.

The show is open until Sunday 9th September in the Grand Hall, Albert Dock.

For more information visit www.popcultured.co.uk




Get the Flash Player to see the wordTube Media Player.